Taming Stomachs With Fodmap Diet Spurs $8 Billion Market

Trying to beat IBS? Cut out cabbage and honey: It may have an indigestible name… but the FODMAP food plan stops symptoms in 75 per cent of cases

The precise cause of IBS is unclear, but stress and problems with the immune system or how gut muscles squeeze food through the bowel may play a part

Gluten-free food is flourishing, said Ewa Hudson, head of health and wellness food and beverages research at London- based Euromonitor International Ltd. , who predicts retail sales of food intolerance products will reach $10.5 billion worldwide by 2017, especially as more grocery chains carry them. Food Revolution The market in developed nations has undergone a revolution, Hudson said in an e-mail. Prior to that, gluten- free had been the preserve of pharmacies and specialist health- food stores. Abbott and Mead Johnson Nutrition Co. (MJN) have about 7 percent each of the global food-intolerance market by value, according to Euromonitor. Abbott, which sells intolerance products under the Vital and Ensure labels, introduced a limited-ingredient, gluten-free nutrition bar called Perfectly Simple in June. We expect to launch an additional 20 products and formulations this year and have more than 30 clinical studies, Abbott said Oct. 17, when it reported third-quarter earnings. Shepherd said shes sold almost 200,000 copies of her eight cookbooks, which include Irresistibles for the Irritable , that help people choose bowel-friendlier foods. The recipes avoid sugars that arent well absorbed in some peoples bowels, found in products ranging from onions to yoghurts. Too Much Gas These foods can cause bloating, excess gas, abdominal discomfort and diarrhea in some people — hallmarks of irritable bowel syndrome experienced by at least 10 to 15 percent of adults, according to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders , a research and education group in Milwaukee , Wisconsin . I pieced together what was an experimental diet, said Shepherd, who began teaching the regimen in her private dietetics practice in early 1997. I wasnt randomly picking these foods — they all had something in common: they were all potentially not absorbed in the small intestine. Peter Gibson , gastroenterology professor at Melbournes Monash University, helped coin the term Fodmap to describe the molecules people with irritable bowel syndrome have difficulty stomaching — fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols found in dozens of everyday things from apples and wheat to milk, high-fructose corn syrup, and sugarless chewing gum. Fell Off My Chair Shepherd, who has celiac disease, tested her diet on 25 people, preparing all their meals herself for 22 weeks in a study that formed part of a PhD thesis at Monash.

his explanation http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-10-28/taming-stomachs-with-fodmap-diet-spurs-8-billion-market.html

Fodmap diet shows promise taming stomachs

Dr. Jason Tye-Din collects blood from a patient at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne.

Passing through to the bowel undigested, they are rapidly fermented by colonic bacteria, which draw in fluid and produce gas, significantly exacerbating IBS symptoms in susceptible individuals. The new diet is low in FODMAPs. FINDING THE TRIGGERS Established treatments centre on trying to calm symptoms, with anti-spasmodic medications, adjustments in fibre intake, stress management or taking small, regular meals. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines suggest that sufferers may also benefit from limiting gas-producing food ingredients, such as resistant starch (found in some processed and reheated food) and sorbitol (a sweetener found commonly in sugar-free chewing gums). But as Sasha Watkins, a spokeswoman for the British Dietetic Association, explains: Treatment for IBS sufferers is often limited, which is why the emerging success of the low-FODMAP diet an approach that helps patients discover the precise foods that trigger their symptoms is excellent news. TRIAL AND ERROR Developed by a team at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, the low-FODMAP diet has been shown to work in a placebo-controlled trial, and is more effective than all other previous dietary treatments for IBS. It has also been successfully adapted in the UK by researchers at Kings College, London, and implemented at Guys and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust in London. Peter Irving, consultant gastroenterologist at Guys and St Thomas, says: I can now refer IBS patients for dietetic advice with a greater degree of confidence that their quality of life will improve. The precise cause of IBS is unclear, but stress and problems with the immune system or how gut muscles squeeze food through the bowel may play a part HONEY TRAP Patients on the diet go for eight weeks without consuming any FODMAP-rich foods which include honey, wheat, apples, pears and stone fruits (such as plums and peaches), along with the onion family and artichokes. Traditionally windy foods such as cabbage and beans must also be given up, as must polyol sweeteners (such as sorbitol, mannitol and xylitol), which are often added to sugar-free varieties of mint, chocolate and chewing gum. EASY DOES IT After the eight weeks are up during which time the gut is rested and it is expected that symptoms will subside the period of reintroducing the offending FODMAPs, group by group, begins. The aim is for sufferers to discover which fermentable carbohydrates they are most sensitive to, and to identify their individual tolerance level so that they can plan a diet that suits them. For example, to check tolerance to the m, or monosaccharide in the acronym FODMAP, people would start with a teaspoon of honey, which is very rich in the monosaccharide fructose, and build up gradually, says Sasha Watkins. ASK THE EXPERTS Heidi Staudacher, who delivers FODMAPs training to dieticians, says IBS sufferers should not try the plan without medical supervision. Information on the internet or in books is often conflicting or out of date, she says. Advice from a registered dietician with whom patients are likely to need up to three one-hour sessions is crucial for good results, and should be obtained after appropriate assessment by a GP or gastroenterologist. An increasing number of privately registered dieticians are now offering FODMAPs advice costing 55 to 80 for an hour-long session.

find out here http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2173597/FODMAP-food-plan-Cut-cabbage-honey-want-beat-symptoms-IBS.html

Royal Melbourne Hospital Gastroenterologist Jason Tye-Din

“We expect to launch an additional 20 products and formulations this year and have more than 30 clinical studies,” Abbott said Oct. 17, when it reported third-quarter earnings. Shepherd said she’s sold almost 200,000 copies of her eight cookbooks, which include “Irresistibles for the Irritable,” that help people choose bowel-friendlier foods. The recipes avoid sugars that aren’t well-absorbed in some people’s bowels, found in products ranging from onions to yogurts. These foods can cause bloating, excess gas, abdominal discomfort and diarrhea in some people hallmarks of irritable bowel syndrome experienced by at least 10 percent to 15 percent of adults, according to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, a research and education group in Milwaukee, Wis. “I pieced together what was an experimental diet,” said Shepherd, who began teaching the regimen in her private dietetics practice in early 1997. “I wasn’t randomly picking these foods. They all had something in common: They were all potentially not absorbed in the small intestine.” Peter Gibson, gastroenterology professor at Melbourne’s Monash University, helped coin the term Fodmap to describe the molecules people with irritable bowel syndrome have difficulty stomaching: fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols found in dozens of everyday things from apples and wheat to milk, high-fructose corn syrup and sugarless chewing gum. Shepherd, who has celiac disease, tested her diet on 25 people, preparing all their meals herself for 22 weeks in a study that formed part of a Ph.D. thesis at Monash. She found the diet quelled symptoms in at least 70 percent of participants, compared with 12 percent given a placebo meal resembling typical Australian fare.

more helpful hints http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20121105/entlife/711059975

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